I’m working on finishing up a 60-some page book of very short stories. I’ll say a bit more about it after the important parts of this post. As a concluding thought in the book, I’ve written this brief musing to accompany the illustration which is also presented in this post:

[…] I uphold that love is essential to life whereas hate is an unnecessary consequence of the former. Love, minimally in some form of self-love, is required for life to continue living. Hate will exists as one of many possible means of defending that which is loved—this, at minimum, being the identity of the very person(s) which actively hate. Unlike opposites such as up and down, or yin and yang, love and hate do not form an inseparable duality. Whereas hate’s existence will always be dependent on the presence of some form of love, love can not only exist but thrive in the absence of all hatred.

So, to me at least, as hard as this ideal might be to accomplish, there’s some worthwhile truth to be found in the phrase, “all you need is love”.

Yup, I had a Beatles song in mind with the concluding phrase. Moreover, I really do believe this statement—as curtly worded as it might be—epitomizes a central existential truth of being human. Yes, of course it gets more complex with the myriad realities of life, but the crucial essence expressed still holds, imo.

The glyph for which this musing was written is presented below. This composite illustration of peace, love, and harmony (or of understanding—as expressed through the yin-yang) I’d like to make available to anyone who might be interested in doing something with it. For this purpose, I’m officially releasing it into the public domain. If you enjoy it, feel free to copy and, if you want, modify it. I really wouldn’t mind seeing it publicly every now and then.

Peace-Love-and-Harmony---Glyph


If you’re still reading, here’s a bit more about the book I’m intending to self-publish in the near future:

Its titled, Crossroads: Ultra-short stories of the absurd. Its book description is: “The calamities of war, a logical argument for why kisses are impossible, the trials of owning a detachable heart, and what awaits those who climb ropes suspended from skies—these and other themes are explored through brief absurdist narratives in styles that span the grisly, the contemplative, and the darkly comic.”

I want to make it free to download at common online book stores (though one such place might still charge 99 cents for it). And, of course, I’ll make it available on this website when the time comes.

No need to worry about the book if you like the glyph, though. I hope this post’s freely offered image finds more than a few happy homes.